Aislinn Currie-Jordan

Quantitative Analysis of the Feeding and Attraction Behaviour of UK Mosquito Species

Personal Statement:

Aislinn started in October 2015 in the Vector Biology and Climate Modelling Theme PhD studentship ‘Quantitative analysis of the attraction and feeding behaviour of mosquito species to humans in the UK’, with supervisors Steve Torr and Philip McCall from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), Matthew Baylis from the University of Liverpool and Jolyon Medlock of Public Health England.

 

Aislinn is an MSc graduate in ‘The Biology and Control of Parasites and Disease Vectors’ from LSTM, with experience in mosquito biology and insecticide resistance.

          

 

Aislinn Currie Jordan

Lay Summary:

Mosquito-borne viruses pose a global threat with increases number of cases recorded in Europe. Several of the mosquito species present in the UK have the potential to act as vectors for viruses such as Japanese encephalitis and West Nile. Despite this potential risk, our understanding of mosquito behaviour and ecology is limited. By studying the behaviour and ecology of UK mosquito species we will improve our understanding of the risk these mosquitoes pose and provide a basis for development of appropriate control strategies.

A combination of both field and laboratory work will be carried out to better our understanding of mosquito ecology on the Wirral. One species, Aedes detritus, is of particular interest. This mosquito species is highly abundant on the Wirral where it is a huge nuisance biter. Additionally, this species has previously been shown to be competent for several mosquito borne viruses under laboratory conditions.

Supervisors:

  • Steve Torr - NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
  • Matthew Baylis - NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, University of Liverpool
  • Jolyon Medlock - NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Public Health England
  • Philip McCall - Everett-Dutton Reader in Medical Entomology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine